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1 oct 2021

  • Japonés
  • Inglés (US)
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While (a) is speaking in generalities about an action, (b) is referring to a specific action that “you” did with condemnation.
Is it correct to assume that “for” and “of” are basically applied as such nuances in this syntax?

(a) It’s wrong for a man to play with a woman’s affections.
(b) It’s wrong of you to trifle with her affections.

Also, the textbook’s explanation that “careless” is used in this syntax, but “careful” is not, is not quite clear to me. It seems to me that you could put it as “It was careful of her not to spill the water”, but is there any good reason for that? 

(a) She was careless (= It was careless of her) to spill the water.
(b) She was careful (= She took care) not to spill the water.

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  • Inglés (US)

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While (a) is speaking in generalities about an action, (b) is referring to a specific action that “you” did with condemnation.
Is it correct to assume that “for” and “of” are basically applied as such nuances in this syntax?

(a) It’s wrong for a man to play with a woman’s affections.
(b) It’s wrong of you to trifle with her affections.

Also, the textbook’s explanation that “careless” is used in this syntax, but “careful” is not, is not quite clear to me. It seems to me that you could put it as “It was careful of her not to spill the water”, but is there any good reason for that? 

(a) She was careless (= It was careless of her) to spill the water.
(b) She was careful (= She took care) not to spill the water.
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